M Robinson Counseling

Services

 The therapeutic techniques and approaches I describe below inspire my therapy. 

Individual Therapy

People tend to identify themselves by their problems. But, Narrative Therapists suggest that people should “externalize” their problems, and see themselves” separate” from the problem. Everyone has problems, but they do not have to define us. We are more than our problems.

Granted, human beings are unique and complex beings. They have challenges BUT, they also have successes… LOTS of successes. Therefore,  Narrative Therapists use techniques to help individuals, couples and families acknowledge their strengths, successes and triumphs. After all, we are all resilient beings. We are capable of healing, excelling and thriving. Narrative Therapists rely on the clients inner strength and innate skills to bring healing.

In addition to helping clients externalize problems and focus on strengths, Narrative therapists also encompass storytelling as part of their therapeutic process. Everyone has a story. Our story is our personal narrative. Sometimes our stories change, depending on who we are talking to, or what we think they want to hear. Our stories also differ, depending on our current phase of life.  Each person’s story is unique and essential to his/her growth and healing. I enjoy hearing people’s stories. I enjoy hearing of their experiences, challenges, downfalls and successes. We all have them, and we use stories to relate to each other, as we experience the world…together.

“Narrative therapy capitalizes on our storytelling tendencies for growth and development, ways to find meaning, and a pathway to a better understanding of ourselves” (Ackerman, 2019). In my therapy, I utilize Narrative therapy techniques.

For more information about Narrative Therapy, follow the link: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/narrative-therapy

Couples Therapy

Couples connect for various reasons. Something attracts them to each other, and something keeps them together. However, at times, issues arise that affect the couple’s relationship. Sometimes, these issues are related to trust, finances, communication, etc. It is important for the therapist to help the couple identify the issues and solutions, in order to rekindle the relationship. The couple may be encouraged to explore “feelings and vulnerabilities,” as recommended in Emotionally Focused Therapy. 

Of course, if there is domestic violence in the relationship, the individuals should not be seen for couples therapy. Rather, the therapist should refer the victim to a state certified domestic violence program. The abuser should enroll in a Batterers Intervention Program, also provided by a state certified domestic violence program. “Effective couples therapists point out the strengths in the relationship and build resilience particularly as therapy nears a close.  Because so much of couples therapy involves focusing on problem areas, it’s easy to lose sight of the other areas in which couples function effectively. The point of promoting strength is to help the couple derive more enjoyment out of their relationship” (Psychology Today).  

“Effective couples therapists point out the strengths in the relationship and build resilience particularly as therapy nears a close.  Because so much of couples therapy involves focusing on problem areas, it’s easy to lose sight of the other areas in which couples function effectively. The point of promoting strength is to help the couple derive more enjoyment out of their relationship” (Psychology Today).  

Furthermore, “Often, clients are dealing with angerfear, loss of trust, or sense of betrayal in their relationship.”

Family Therapy

One of my favorite family therapists is Salvador Minuchin. When I first learned of Minuchin, almost 15 years ago, I fell in love with his therapeutic style, bold techniques and mesmerizing accent. Minuchin recognized that when there were issues within the family, the “family” and not one person, needed support and movement. Minuchin was intentional in therapy. He did not mince his words. He called “a spade a spade.” 

According to Minuchin, “A well functioning family is not defined by the absence of stress or conflict, but by how effectively it handles them as it responds to the developing needs of its members and the changing conditions in its  environment.” Though I am not a trained Structural Family Therapist, I utilize Structural techniques in my therapy with families. Minuchin’s focus, like mine, is to recognize the families’ strength and mobilizing effective solutions to helping the family succeed. 

Empowerment sessions

These sessions are for individuals and/or small groups who need a boost or significant motivation to accomplish a goal(s). (Fees may vary for this service).